Man-Made

Structures and other landmarks made by human beings.

40-Wall-Street-(The-Trump-Building)

40 Wall Street (The Trump Building)

New York, New York, 10005
40 Wall Street is a 70-story skyscraper originally known as The Bank of the Manhattan Company building. It was completed in 1930 after only 11 months of construction, and was the tallest building in the world for less than 2 months.

44-Monroe

44 Monroe

Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona
This 523,619-square-foot, 34-story tower is Arizona's tallest residential structure. The building's design was inspired by Jennifer J.L. Jones' painting named "Five Elements."

Abo-Pueblo-Ruins

Abo Pueblo Ruins

Abo, Torrance County, New Mexico, 87036
Abo is a pueblo ruin in New Mexico that is preserved in the Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument. There is a trail through the mission ruins, and a 0.5 mile (0.8 km) trail around the unexcavated pueblo ruins.

Abraham-Lincoln-Statue

Abraham Lincoln Statue

Washington, District of Columbia, 20001
Located in Washington, D.C.'s Lincoln Memorial, this sculpture was designed by Daniel Chester French and was based on photographs of President Lincoln.

Absecon-Light

Absecon Light

Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey, 08401
Absecon Light is the fifth tallest lighthouse in the United States. Its beason was first lighted on January 15, 1857. Although it is no longer an active navigational aid, the light still shines every night.

Academy-of-Music

Academy of Music

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19102
Opened in 1857, the building is the oldest grand opera house in America used for its original purpose. It is the home of the Pennsylvania Ballet and the Philadelphia Opera Company.

Acoma-Pueblo

Acoma Pueblo

, Cibola County, New Mexico
Also known as "Sky City", Acoma Pueblo is a American Indian site built on top of a 367-foot (112 m) sandstone mesa. It is regarded as the oldest continuously inhabited community in the United States.

Adams-National-Historical-Park

Adams National Historical Park

Quincy, Massachusetts
This National Historical Park contains the home of presidents John and John Quincy Adams. It features the house, the surrounding farmland and several other buildings, including the Stone Library.

Adler-Planetarium-and-Astronomy-Museum

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60605
The Adler opened in 1930 and was the first planetarium in the Western Hemisphere. Donated to the city of Chicago by Max Adler, the planetarium was an attraction at the great Chicago exposition of 1933-34.

Adventure-Island

Adventure Island

Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, 33612
Adventure Island's 30 acres contains a blend of water rides, outdoor cafes, picnic and sunbathing areas, gift shops, and a championship white-sand volleyball complex set within a Key West atmosphere.

Agudath-Israel-Etz-Ahayem-Synagogue

Agudath Israel Etz Ahayem Synagogue

Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, 36111
Agudath Israel Etz Ahayem Synagogue is a conservative synagogue serving mostly Ashkenazic and Sephardic Jews. The Synagogue was built in 1957.

Akron-Art-Museum

Akron Art Museum

Akron, Summit County, Ohio, 44308
The museum first opened its doors on February 1, 1922 as the Akron Art Institute. It was located in two borrowed rooms in the basement of the public library. After 1965, the institute was transformed from a school and art center into a museum.

Ala-Moana-Center

Ala Moana Center

Honolulu, Hawaii, 96814
Ala Moana Center is the largest shopping mall in Hawaii and is currently the largest open-air shopping center in the world. There are more than 290 shops and restaurants. The center is visited by over 56 million people a year.

Alaska-Native-Brotherhood-Hall-(Sitka-Camp-No.-1)

Alaska Native Brotherhood Hall (Sitka Camp No. 1)

Sitka, Alaska
The building is significant for being the original chapter of the Alaska Native Brotherhood, an organization representing native rights in Alaska.

Alaska-State-Capitol

Alaska State Capitol

Juneau, Alaska, 99801
Originally called the Federal and Territorial Building, the building became the State Capitol when Alaska joined the Union in 1959. Attempts have been made to replace the building with a new Capitol, but a design could not be agreed upon.

Alcatraz-Island

Alcatraz Island

, California
Often referred to as "The Rock" or simply Alcatraz, the island has been the location of a lighthouse, a fort, a military and federal prison and an American Indian protest. It has become a popular tourist attraction.

Aldrich-Contemporary-Art-Museum

Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, 06877
Larry Aldrich purchased the historic building to contain his growing collection of art in 1964. The building was nicknamed "Old Hundred" because it served as a grocery and hardware store from 1783 to 1883 and as Ridgefield's first post office.

Allegheny-Portage-Railroad-National-Historic-Site

Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site

, Pennsylvania
The Allegheny Portage Railroad was the first railroad constructed through the Allegheny Mountains in central Pennsylvania. It was approximately 36 miles (58 km) long, and operated from 1834 to 1854.

Aloha-Tower

Aloha Tower

Honolulu, Hawaii, 96813
Opened on September 11, 1926, the Aloha Tower is a guiding beacon welcoming vessels to the City of Honolulu. The tower is 10 stories tall (184 feet (56 m)) topped with a 40 feet (12 m) tall flag mast.

America's-Black-Holocaust-Museum

America's Black Holocaust Museum

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
The museum is the only memorial dedicated specifically to the victims of the enslavement of Africans in the United States.

American-Visionary-Art-Museum

American Visionary Art Museum

Baltimore, MaryLand, 21230
The 35,000-square-foot main building of the museum combines an elliptical, three-story, historic industrial building with extensive new architecture. There is also a Tall Sculpture Barn, a former whiskey warehouse with 45-foot ceilings.

Ames-Monument

Ames Monument

, Albany County, Wyoming
Dedicated to brothers Oakes Ames and Oliver Ames, the monument is a four-sided, random ashlar pyramid, 60 feet square at the base and 60 feet high, constructed of light-colored native granite. It was completed in 1882.

Arizona-State-Capitol

Arizona State Capitol

Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, 85007
The design of the Capitol is optimized for the desert climate of Arizona. The thick masonry walls insulate the interior, while skylights and round "bullseye" clerestory windows let heat out.

Arkansas-Childrens-Hospital

Arkansas Childrens Hospital

Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas, 72202
Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH), is the only pediatric medical center in Arkansas and the sixth largest in the United States. ACH is a teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Arkansas-State-Capitol

Arkansas State Capitol

Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas, 72201
Completed in 1915 with the aid of prisoners, the Arkansas State Capitol was built on the site of the State Penitentiary. The grounds contain many memorials including a Vietnam Veterans Memorial and a memorial to Confederate Women of Arkansas.

Arlington-House-(The-Robert-E.-Lee-Memorial)

Arlington House (The Robert E. Lee Memorial)

Arlington, Virginia
During the American Civil War, the grounds of the mansion were selected as the site of Arlington National Cemetery, in part to ensure that Confederate General Robert E. Lee would never again be able to return to his home.

Arlington-Memorial-Bridge

Arlington Memorial Bridge

Washington, District of Columbia
The bridge's construction was authorized by Congress on February 24, 1925 and formally opened on January 16, 1932. Designed by architectural firm McKim, Mead and White, the neo-classical bridge is 2,163 feet (660 m) long.

Arlington-National-Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington, Virginia
The cemetery was established on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna Custis Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington.

Astroland

Astroland

New York, New York
First opened in 1962, Astroland covers 3.1 acres on Coney Island.

AT&T-Building

AT&T Building

Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, 37201
The AT&T Building is the tallest building in Tennessee. It's two tall spires have resulted in it being nicknamed "The Batman Building." The decorative bridge of the structure was designed to resemble a telephone receiver sitting in its cradle.

Athens-Lunatic-Asylum-(The-Ridges)

Athens Lunatic Asylum (The Ridges)

Athens, Ohio
The hospital was in operation from 1874 to 1993 and for many years, was Athens' largest employer. The site is now owned by Ohio University and is part of a development called The Ridges. It is considered to be haunted.

Atlantic-City-Boardwalk

Atlantic City Boardwalk

Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey
At a combined length of approximately 5.75 miles (9.25 kilometers), the Atlantic City / Ventnor boardwalk is currently the longest boardwalk in the world. Strolling the boardwalk will take you past famous hotels, casinos and streets.

Atwater-Kent-Museum

Atwater Kent Museum

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Designed by John Haviland, the Greek-Revival style building was the original home to the Franklin Institute, which opened for students in 1826. It has been the city's history museum since 1938.

Baltimore-Civil-War-Museum

Baltimore Civil War Museum

Baltimore, MaryLand, 21202
Originally the President Street Station, this site and the rail line were key elements of the "underground railroad" by which many slaves escaped to the north before the Civil War.

Baltimore-Museum-of-Art

Baltimore Museum of Art

Baltimore, MaryLand, 21218
This historic building was designed in the 1920s by renowned American architect John Russell Pope. A massive wing for contemporary art was added in 1994.

Baltimore's-Inner-Harbor

Baltimore's Inner Harbor

Baltimore, MaryLand
The area is home to many of Baltimore's most popular tourist attractions, including Harborplace, The USS Constellation, the National Aquarium, and the Maritime Museum.

Bank-of-America-Tower

Bank of America Tower

St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida, 33701
The Bank of America Tower is a 28-story skyscraper designed by Jung Brannen Associates which was completed in 1990. Rising 386 feet (118 m), it is currently the tallest building in St. Petersburg.

Bankhead-Tunnel

Bankhead Tunnel

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama
Named for John Hollis Bankhead, an Alabama politician and U.S. Senator, the tunnel was built in sections and floated to the proper positions, then sunk. It opened to the public on February 20, 1941.

Barnegat-Lighthouse

Barnegat Lighthouse

Barnegat Light, Ocean County, New Jersey, 08006
Barnegat Lighthouse, colloquially known as "Old Barney", is located on the northern tip of Long Beach Island. Situated along the Barnegat Inlet, it is the fourth tallest lighthouse in the United States.

Barrackville-Covered-Bridge

Barrackville Covered Bridge

Barrackville, Marion County, West Virginia, 26452
Built in 1853 by Eli and Lemuel Chenoweth, well-known bridge builders of the time, the 148 feet span is now closed to motor traffic. It was restored in 1999.

Barton-Academy

Barton Academy

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, 36602
Barton Academy was the first public school in the state of Alabama. The building was named for Willoughby Barton, an Alabama state legislator from Mobile who introduced an act that created the Board of School Commissioners of Mobile County

Barton-Hall-(Cunningham-Plantation)

Barton Hall (Cunningham Plantation)

, Colbert County, Alabama
Built for Armstead Barton in the 1840s, this antebellum, privately-owned home is an unusually sophisticated Greek Revival style plantation house with a small Doric entrance and limestone-paved rear courtyard.

Bathhouse-Row

Bathhouse Row

Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas, 71901
Bathhouse Row is a collection of bathhouses which were included in 1832 when the Federal Government took over the land to preserve 47 natural hot springs and their area of origin on the lower slopes of Hot Springs Mountain.

Bear-River-Massacre-Monument

Bear River Massacre Monument

, Franklin County, Idaho
The monument was erected by the Daughters of Utah Pioneers in memory of the Battle of Bear River (Massacre at Boa Ogoi), which took place on January 29, 1863, between the United States Army and the Shoshone Indians.

Belcourt-Castle

Belcourt Castle

Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island
Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont. It is the only mansion in Newport which is both open to the public and has a private owner in residence.

Belk-Theater

Belk Theater

Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, 28202
The Belk Theater is the largest venue in the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center, seating 2100 at its full-capacity configuration.

Bellagio-Hotel-and-Casino

Bellagio Hotel and Casino

Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, 89109
Owned by MGM Mirage, the Bellagio was built on the site of the demolished Dunes hotel and casino. The building was inspired by the Lake Como resort of Bellagio, Italy.

Benewah-Milk-Bottle

Benewah Milk Bottle

Spokane, Washington
This is one of two milk bottles that were constructed in the Spokane area to advertise the Benewah Dairy Company. Built in 1935, the structure is built of stucco and sheet metal.

Benjamin-Franklin-Bridge

Benjamin Franklin Bridge

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The Benjamin Franklin Bridge, originally named the Delaware River Bridge, is a suspension bridge across the Delaware River connecting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Camden, New Jersey.

Benjamin-Franklin-Craftsman-Sculpture

Benjamin Franklin Craftsman Sculpture

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19107
This sculpture by Joe Brown was presented to the city of Philadelphia by the Pennsylvania Free Masons whose temple is across the street. The artwork was dedicated on June 27, 1981.

Benjamin-Franklin-National-Memorial

Benjamin Franklin National Memorial

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Located in the the Franklin Institute Science Museum, the National Memorial features a 20 feet (6m) tall statue of Benjamin Franklin sculpted by James Earle Fraser between 1906 and 1911.

Berkeley-Castle

Berkeley Castle

Berkely Springs (Bath), Morgan County, West Virginia, 25411
The 13 room cottage was built by Samuel Taylor Suit, the manufacturer of a popular whiskey. Begun in 1885, the "castle" became the local venue for galas and other events of the social elite.

Beth-Sholom-Synagogue

Beth Sholom Synagogue

Elkins Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
The only synagogue ever designed by famed architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, Beth Sholom is Hebrew for House of Peace. Its steeply inclined walls of translucent wire glass and plastic are meant to represent both a mountain and a tent.

Bethel-Baptist-Church,-Parsonage,-and-Guardhouse

Bethel Baptist Church, Parsonage, and Guardhouse

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35207
The Bethel Baptist Church, Parsonage, and Guardhouse are associated with the first organized movement of the modern civil rights movement. The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights was headquartered here from 1956-1961.

Betsy-Ross-House

Betsy Ross House

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Betsy Ross House is generally recognized as the place where Betsy Ross lived when she may have made the first American Flag. The building was built around 1740 and is presented as it would have looked when Betsy Ross lived and worked there.

Big-Bay-Point-Light

Big Bay Point Light

Big Bay, Marquette County, Michigan, 49808
Big Bay Point Light is the only operational lighthouse with a bed and breakfast. It is reputed to be haunted, and the novel and movie Anatomy of a Murder were inspired by a murder at the lighthouse.

Big-Ben-at-Franklin-Town

Big Ben at Franklin Town

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This stainless steel silhouetted bust of Benjamin Franklin has porticos resembling keys and supporting blue arches mounting crests resembling kites. Four additional columns support abstract lightning bolts.

Big-Chicken

Big Chicken

Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia, 30062
This famous KFC was originally Johnny Reb's Chick, Chuck and Shake Restaurant. The 56 feet (17 meter) tall chicken was constructed in 1963 and was reconstructed in 1993 after a storm damaged the original structure.

Big-Duck

Big Duck

Flanders, Suffolk County, New York
The Big Duck was an advertising gimmick built by a farmer to sell duck eggs and other poultry. The building has been moved several times and is now located between Flanders and Hampton Bays on Long Island.

Big-Well

Big Well

Greensburg, Kiowa County, Kansas, 67054
The Greensburg Well is water well that was designed to provide water for the Santa Fe and Rock Island railroads. It is billed as the world's largest hand-dug well, at 109 feet deep and 32 feet in diameter.

Biltmore-House

Biltmore House

Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina, 28803
Built between 1888 and 1895 for George Washington Vanderbilt II, this French Renaissance-inspired chateau is the largest privately-owned home in the United States at 175,000 square feet.

Birmingham-Civil-Rights-Institute

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35203
Opened in November of 1992, Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is a large interpretive museum and research center that depicts the struggles of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s.

Block-House

Block House

Claymont, New Castle County, Delaware, 19703
The Block House was originally designed for defense against local Indians. It was constructed in 1654 by John Risingh, Governor of the Colony of New Sweden and is the only house remaining of original settlement on Naaman’s Creek.

Boca-Raton-Museum-of-Art

Boca Raton Museum of Art

Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, Florida, 33432
The museum features an assortment of traveling exhibitions and permanent collections from established and rising artists. An outdoor sculpture garden is among the museum's highlights.

Boll-Weevil-Monument

Boll Weevil Monument

Enterprise, Coffee County, Alabama, 36330
The city erected the statue because the destruction of the cotton crop led to agricultural diversity and more prosperity than had ever come from cotton alone. It is said to be the only statue to an insect pest in the world.

Boston-Public-Library

Boston Public Library

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 02116
The Boston Public Library is the largest municipal public library in the United States and is the third-largest library in the country. It was the first public library to allow people to borrow books and other materials and take them home to read and use.

Bourbon-Street-(Rue-Bourbon)

Bourbon Street (Rue Bourbon)

New Orleans, Louisiana
When New Orleans was founded in 1718, it was originally centered around the French Quarter. The city has since expanded, but "The Quarter" remains the cultural hub with Bourbon Street as one of its main attractions.

Bronx-Zoo

Bronx Zoo

New York, New York
The largest metropolitan zoo in the United States, the Bronx Zoo comprises 265 acres of parklands and naturalistic habitats and is home to over 4,000 animals.

Brooklyn-Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

New York, New York
The Brooklyn Bridge stretches 5,989 feet (1825 m) over the East River connecting the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Brown-Chapel-A.M.E.-Church

Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church

Selma, Dallas County, Alabama, 36703
This church was a starting point for the Selma to Montgomery marches in 1965 and played a major role in the events that led to the adoption of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Busch-Stadium

Busch Stadium

St. Louis, Missouri, 63102
Also called New Busch Stadium or Busch Stadium III, the baseball park opened on April 4, 2006. It offers a panoramic view of the downtown St. Louis skyline, as well as the city's distinctive Gateway Arch.

California-State-Capitol

California State Capitol

Sacramento, California, 95814
The California Capitol building is home to the Office of the Governor, the California Legislature and the State Capitol Museum. Like many capitols around the country, it is neoclassical in design and has a dome.

California-State-University,-Chico

California State University, Chico

Chico, Butte County, California, 95929
California State University, Chico is the second-oldest campus in the California State University system. Founded in 1887 as the Northern Branch State Normal School of California, it became part of the state university system in 1972.

Canal-Street

Canal Street

New Orleans, Louisiana
Canal Street is a major thoroughfare in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. It is the dividing line between the older French and Spanish Colonial era city and the newer Central Business District.

Cape-Charles-Light

Cape Charles Light

, Northamption County, Virginia, 23310
The current Cape Charles Light is a skeleton tower lighthouse at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. It is the tallest lighthouse in Virginia and the second tallest in the United States. It is the third light at this location.

Cape-Hatteras-Light

Cape Hatteras Light

Buxton, Dare County, North Carolina, 27920
Located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is recognized as the tallest lighthouse in America. It is still in operation. The light at the top is automated and is visible every seven seconds.

Carnegie-Hall

Carnegie Hall

New York, New York, 10019
Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who paid for its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served.

Carnegie-Public-Library

Carnegie Public Library

East Liverpool, Columbiana County, Ohio, 43920
Opened and dedicated on May 8, 1902, the library was built using a donation from Andrew Carnegie. It was built of Roman mottled buff-brown brick trimmed with white tile.

Carpenter's-Hall

Carpenter's Hall

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Build in 1770 and owned by oldest trade guild in America, Carpenter's Hall was the site of the First Continental Congress in 1774. Today it is part of Independence National Historical Park.

Castillo-de-San-Marcos-National-Monument

Castillo de San Marcos National Monument

Saint Augustine, St. John's County, Florida
Built between 1672 and 1695, Castillo de San Marcos was the first masonry fort constructed to defend Saint Augustine. It was known as Fort St. Mark from 1763 until 1784 while under British control and Fort Marion from 1821 until 1942.

Cataldo-Mission

Cataldo Mission

Cataldo, Kootenai County, Idaho
Also called the Mission of the Sacred Heart, the church is the oldest standing building in Idaho. It was designed by Antonio Ravalli, who made sure that it was constructed by local Indians so that they could feel part of the church.

Cathedral-Basilica-of-Saints-Peter-and-Paul

Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The cathedral was dedicated on November 20, 1864 by James Frederick Wood, the first Archbishop of Philadelphia. It is modeled after the Lombard Church of St. Charles (San Carlo al Corso) in Rome and is of the Roman-Corinthian style of architecture.

Cathedral-of-Saint-Paul,-National-Shrine-of-the-Apostle-Paul

Cathedral of Saint Paul, National Shrine of the Apostle Paul

St. Paul, Minnesota, 55102
The Cathedral of Saint Paul is a Roman Catholic cathedral. The design was inspired by French Renaissance architecture. The dome of the cathedral is 76 feet (23 m) in diameter and 186 feet (57 m) high.

Chadwick-Arboretum-&-Learning-Gardens

Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens

Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, 43210
The arboretum proper contains roughly 1,000 trees representing over 120 species that grow throughout Ohio. It also includes a Learning Garden and specialized gardens for annuals, hostas, perennials, roses, and wildflowers.

Charlie-the-Tuna

Charlie the Tuna

Atu'u, American Samoa
Atu'u is called the permanent home of Charlie the Tuna, a cartoon mascot use in advertising for the Starkist® company.

Chase-County-Kansas-Courthouse

Chase County Kansas Courthouse

Cottonwood Falls, Chase County, Kansas
The courthouse was completed in 1873, making it the oldest courthouse still in use west of the Mississippi River. It is also the state's finest remaining example of Second Empire architecture.

Cherokee-National-Capitol

Cherokee National Capitol

Tahlequah, Cherokee County, Oklahoma, 74464
The Cherokee National Capitol served as the headquarters for Cherokee government from the time of its completion until 1907 when Oklahoma became a State. The structure is fairly well preserved and is a late example of the Italianate style.

Chicago-Midway-International-Airport-(MDW)

Chicago Midway International Airport (MDW)

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60638
Also known simply as Midway Airport, the airport is located on the city's southwest side, eight miles from Chicago's Loop.

Chicago-Water-Tower

Chicago Water Tower

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60611
The Water Tower was built in 1869 by architect William W. Boyington from yellowing Joliet limestone. It is 154 feet (47 m) tall. Today, it serves as the Chicago Convention and Tourism Bureau Visitor's Welcome Center.

Chinatown

Chinatown

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19107
Chinatown functions as a popular tourist destination, a center of trade, and as a home to many of the city's finest ethnic restaurants and bakeries. It is the fourth-largest Chinatown in the United States.

Chinese-Friendship-Arch

Chinese Friendship Arch

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19107
The Friendship Arch is an ornate paifang, a gate or archway used to divide regions of a city. Though many North American Chinatowns have these arches, Philadelphia's version is considered to be more elaborate than most.

Christ-Church

Christ Church

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Constructed between 1727 and 1744, Christ Church is the birthplace of the American Episcopal Church in the United States. The congregation included 15 signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Chrysler-Building

Chrysler Building

New York, New York
Standing at 1,047 feet high (319 m), the Chrysler Building was briefly the world's tallest building before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building in 1931. It is still the world's tallest brick building.

Citizens-Bank-Park

Citizens Bank Park

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19148
Home to the Philadelphia Phillies, Citizens Bank Park is a 43,647-seat baseball-only stadium that opened on April 3, 2004. The ballpark was built to replace Veterans Stadium.

Claymont-Stone-School

Claymont Stone School

Claymont, New Castle County, Delaware
The Claymont Stone School, also known as Naaman’s Creek School #1, is a historic schoolhouse built in 1805. The original building was renovated in 1905 and expanded to become a two room schoolhouse. It was used until 1925.

Cochrane-Africatown-Bridge

Cochrane Africatown Bridge

Mobile, Alabama
The Cochrane Africatown USA Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge carrying mainline US 90 and Truck Route US 98 across the Mobile River in Mobile, Alabama. It is the only cable-stayed bridge in the state of Alabama.

Colorado-State-Capitol

Colorado State Capitol

Denver, Colorado, 80203
The Colorado State Capitol is the home of the Colorado legislature and the offices of the Colorado Governor and Lt. Governor. Real gold was incorporated into the dome to commemorate the Colorado Gold Rush.

Columbus-Park

Columbus Park

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60644
The 135-acre Columbus Park is considered the masterpiece of nationally renowned landscape architect, Jens Jensen, who is recognized as creator of Prairie style landscape design.

Connecticut-State-Capitol

Connecticut State Capitol

Hartford, Connecticut, 06106
Two competitors bid to be awarded the project. One won, but the other was named the building contractor, who continually revised the winner's plan to more and more closely resemble his own plan.

Copley-Square-Hotel

Copley Square Hotel

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 02116
The Copley Square Hotel was built in 1891 and is Boston’s second-oldest hotel in continuous operation. The seven-floor hotel is mainly constructed of brick, and recently was given a thorough remodeling.

Count-de-Hoernle-Amphitheater

Count de Hoernle Amphitheater

Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, Florida, 33432
Formerly called the Mizner Park Amphitheater, the venue is part of Boca Raton's Centre for the Arts. It opened in 2002. The 3500-seat venue is located adjacent to the shopping area at Mizner Park.

Curtis-Center-(Curtis-Building)

Curtis Center (Curtis Building)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Curtis Publishing Company, founded in 1821 became one of the largest and most influential publishers in the United States during the early 20th century. This building, the company's headquarters, is an example of Georgian Revival architecture.

Darley-House

Darley House

Claymont, New Castle County, Delaware
This is the former home of world-renowned illustrator F. O. C. Darley (1821-1888). Built in the late 18th century and enlarged several times, the house was purchased by Darley in 1863 and renamed "The Wren’s Nest."

Delaware-State-Capitol

Delaware State Capitol

Dover, Kent County, Delaware, 19901
Home of the General Assembly, the Delaware State Capitol is usually referred to as Legislative Hall. It was completed in 1933 and was designed in the colonial style often called Georgian Revival.

Dexter-Avenue-Baptist-Church

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, 36104
This church is where Dr. Martin Luther King organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955.

Dream-Garden

Dream Garden

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Made for Cyrus Curtis by the Louis C. Tiffany Studios, the 260-color mosiac was based on a painting by Maxfield Parrish. Measuring 15 by 49 feet, Dream Garden contains over 100,000 pieces of favrile glass.

Dutch-Wonderland-Amusement-Park

Dutch Wonderland Amusement Park

Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 17602
Appealing primarily to families with small children, the park's theme is a "Kingdom for Kids."

East-Liverpool-High-School-Alumni-Clock-Tower

East Liverpool High School Alumni Clock Tower

East Liverpool, Columbiana County, Ohio, 43920
East Liverpool's most visible landmark, the 126-foot tower is reminiscent of Old Central School, which once stood at the site.

Eisenhower-National-Historic-Site

Eisenhower National Historic Site

Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania
The house served as a Presidential Retreat during the Eisenhower administration and was also home to the Eisenhowers after they left the White House in 1961.

El-Centro-Espanol-of-West-Tampa

El Centro Espanol of West Tampa

Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, 33605
El Centro Espanol was a organization of cigar workers in Ybor City and West Tampa. Build in 1912, members could use the building as a sort of club house or for amenities such as a gym, casino (game room), cafe, etc.

Elfreth's-Alley

Elfreth's Alley

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The houses in this small street have been privately owned and lived in since the early 1700's, making Elfreth's Alley the oldest continuously inhabited residential street in the country.

Ellis-Island

Ellis Island

New York, New York
Between 1892 and 1954, over 12 million European immigrants passed through the processing station at Ellis Island. Today, the island is home to a museum dedicated to immigration and the idea of seeking a new and better life in America.

Episcopal-Church-of-the-Nativity

Episcopal Church of the Nativity

Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, 35801
This church was built in the Gothic Revival style in 1859. It is noted as one of the most pristine examples of Ecclesiological Gothic architecture in the South. It is also one of the least-altered structures by architect Frank Wills.

Everett-Dirksen-Monument

Everett Dirksen Monument

Pekin, Tazewell County, Illinois, 61554
This monument honors Everett McKinley Dirksen, who served Illinois for 34 years as a Republican Congressman and U.S. Senator.

F.-Scott-Fitzgerald-House-aka-Summit-Terrace

F. Scott Fitzgerald House aka Summit Terrace

St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, 55102
The design of the rowhouse was called the "New York Style", although the general flavor is Romanesque Revival. In July and August of 1919, this was where Fitzgerald rewrote the manuscript that became his first novel, This Side of Paradise.

Fallingwater-(Edgar-J.-Kaufmann-Sr.-Residence)

Fallingwater (Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence)

Mill Run, Fayette County, Pennsylvania
One of Frank Lloyd Wright's most famous buildings, Falling Water is a home build over a waterfall. Long horizontal and vertical lines and overhangs were features of Wright's style.

Fels-Planetarium

Fels Planetarium

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The Fels Planetarium is the nation's second oldest planetarium. Samuel S. Fels contributed funds in 1933 so that the new Franklin Institute building could have a planetarium. The auditorium has a dome that is 60-feet in diameter and can hold 330 people.

First-Bank-of-the-United-States

First Bank of the United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Chartered in 1791, the First Bank of the United States was erected in the neo-classical style to echo the democracy of Ancient Greece. The bank building was restored for the Bicentennial in 1976.

Flagler-Memorial-Monument

Flagler Memorial Monument

Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida
A 110-foot (34 m) high obelisk with allegorical sculptures at its base stands as a monument to Miami pioneer Henry M. Flagler. It was constructed in the center of an artificial island in memory of Flagler, who died in 1913.

Flatiron-Building

Flatiron Building

New York, New York, 10010
The Flatiron Building was designed by Chicago's Daniel Burnham in the Beaux-Arts style. The 22-story building, with a height of 285 ft (87 meters), is one of the oldest surviving skyscrapers in Manhattan.

Florida-Citrus-Bowl

Florida Citrus Bowl

Orlando, Orange County, Florida, 32805
The Florida Citrus Bowl currently seats around 70,000. Its main events are the Capital One Bowl and the Champs Sports Bowl. It also hosts the annual Florida Classic between Florida A&M University and Bethune-Cookman College.

Florida-Museum-of-Natural-History

Florida Museum of Natural History

Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida, 32611
The museum was founded in 1891 and relocated to the campus of the University of Florida in 1906 and was chartered as the state's official natural history museum by the Florida Legislature in 1917.

Florida-State-Capitol-(Old)

Florida State Capitol (Old)

Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, 32301
Florida's Old State Capitol Building reopened to the public in 1982. It now serves as a museum covering events in Florida life and government. It is part of the Capitol Complex, which includes the new Capitol and other buildings.

Flushing-Meadows-Corona-Park

Flushing Meadows Corona Park

New York, New York
The park was the site of two world's fairs. It is also famous for its part in the movie "Men In Black."

Fonthill

Fonthill

Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, Fonthill was Built between 1908 and 1912. It is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 42 rooms, 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms.

Fort-McHenry-National-Monument-and-Historic-Shrine

Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine

Baltimore, MaryLand, 21230
During the Battle of Baltimore in 1814, a lawyer named Francis Scott Key was watching the U.S. flag wave over Fort McHenry. He was inspired to write a poem called the "Star-Spangled Banner."

Fort-Mifflin

Fort Mifflin

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Originally called Fort Island Battery, Fort Mifflin was commissioned in 1771. During the American Revolutionary War, the fort was a centerpiece of the British conquest of Philadelphia.

Fort-Mitchell-Site

Fort Mitchell Site

Fort Mitchell, Russell County, Alabama
Fort Mitchell Site is an archaeological site that was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1990.

Fort-Morgan

Fort Morgan

Gasque, Baldwin County, Alabama
The post was named in honor of Revolutionary War hero Daniel Morgan. Construction was completed in 1834 and it was first garrisoned in March of that year. In 2007, it was listed as "one of the nation's 10 most endangered battle sites."

Fort-Sumter

Fort Sumter

Charleston, South Carolina
The fort was named after General Thomas Sumter, a hero of the American Revolution. On April 12, 1861, at 4:30 a.m., Confederate batteries opened fire on the fort, which started the American Civil War.

Fort-Toulouse-Fort-Jackson

Fort Toulouse Fort Jackson

, Elmore County, Alabama
The fort was first established in 1717 by the French to counter the growing influence of the British colonies of Georgia and Carolina. It was named for Louis-Alexandre de Bourbon, comte de Toulouse. Fort Jackson was later built on the site.

Fort-Union-Trading-Post-National-Historic-Site

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

Williston, Williams County, North Dakota, 58801
This was the most important fur trading post on the upper Missouri until 1867. Visitors included John James Audubon, George Catlin, Father Pierre DeSmet, Sitting Bull, Karl Bodmer, and Jim Bridger.

Foster-Auditorium

Foster Auditorium

Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, 35487
This multi-purpose facility was built in 1939 and is most famous as the site of of the "stand in the schoolhouse door" incident. On June 11, 1963, Governor George C. Wallace blocked the entrance to prevent registration of African Americans.

Franklin-Court

Franklin Court

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This is where Benjamin Franklin lived and worked in Philadelphia. The court contains recreations of storefronts and apartments owned and run by Franklin, plus a "ghost house," a steel representation of his house. There is also an underground museum.

Franklin-Delano-Roosevelt-Memorial

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia, 20024
Spread over 7.5 acres, the memorial is composed of four outdoor rooms, one for each of FDR's terms of office. Each of the four areas of the memorial contains a waterfall.

Free-Library-of-Philadelphia-(Central-Library)

Free Library of Philadelphia (Central Library)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19103
The Central Branch of the Free Library is one of two buildings that are replicas of those in the Place de la Concorde in Paris. This was done in part to help establish the Benjamin Franklin Parkway as Philadelphia's Champ Elysees.

French-Quarter

French Quarter

New Orleans, Louisiana
The French Quarter is the oldest and most famous neighborhood in New Orleans, Louisiana. Many of the buildings date from before New Orleans became part of the United States. New Orleans Mardi Gras celebration is centered here.

Gaineswood

Gaineswood

Demopolis, Marengo County, Alabama, 36732
Gaineswood is one of the most significant remaining examples of Greek Revival architecture in Alabama. The house and grounds are currently operated by the Alabama Historical Commission as a historic house museum.

Gamble-House

Gamble House

Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, 91103
Built for one of the owners of the Proctor and Gamble Company, the house is a notable example of the Arts and Crafts style of architecture. It played the part of Dr. Emmett Brown's home in the movie "Back To The Future."

Gateway-Arch-(St.-Louis-Arch)

Gateway Arch (St. Louis Arch)

St. Louis, Missouri
Officially named the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, the arch was built to commemorate the Louisiana Purchase and St. Louis' role as the "gateway" to the western frontier of the early United States.

Georgia-State-Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, 30334
Completed in 1889, this building still serves as the home to Georgia's General Assembly and contains the offices for the governor, lieutenant governor, and secretary of state.

Girard-College

Girard College

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19121
This boarding school teaches grades 1 through 12 on a 43 acre (170,000 m²) campus. It grants full scholarships to eligible students from families with limited financial resources, headed by a single parent or guardian.

Gloria-Dei-(Old-Swede's)-Church

Gloria Dei (Old Swede's) Church

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19147
Founded in 1677, Gloria Dei is the second oldest Swedish church in the United States. The building is Pennsylvania's oldest church building, having been completed sometime around 1700.

Gnadenhutten-Massacre-Monument

Gnadenhutten Massacre Monument

Gnadenhutten, Ohio
The Gnadenhutten Massacre, also known as the Moravian Massacre, was the killing on March 8, 1782, of ninety-six Christian American Indians, including sixty-eight women and children, by American militia from Pennsylvania during the American Revolution.

Go-For-Broke-Monument

Go For Broke Monument

Los Angeles, California
The Go For Broke Monument commemorates Japanese Americans who served overseas in the United States Military during World War II. The monument's wall lists the names of 16,126 Nisei (Second generation Japanese-American) soldiers.

Golden-Gate-Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

San Francisco, San Francisco County, California
The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean.

Golden-North-Hotel

Golden North Hotel

Skagway, Alaska
In Room 23, a ghost that hotel employees have dubbed "Mary" appears in the form of ghostly images. An unexplained orb of light sometimes appears in Room 14.

Golden-Spike-National-Historic-Site

Golden Spike National Historic Site

Promontory Summit, Utah
The Transcontinental Railroad was completed here on May 10, 1869.

Government-Street-Presbyterian-Church

Government Street Presbyterian Church

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, 36602
Government Street Presbyterian Church is one of the oldest Greek Revival church buildings in the United States. The interior is notable because the original Greek Revival design is fully intact with very little alteration.

Great-Plains-Black-History-Museum

Great Plains Black History Museum

North Omaha, Nebraska
The museum is located in the Webster Telephone Exchange Building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Grove-Arcade

Grove Arcade

Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina, 28801
Built by Dr. Edwin Wiley Grove between 1926 and 1929, the elaborate, Tudoresque building occupies a full city block with glazed terra cotta covering its reinforced concrete and steel structure.

Harbor-Tunnel

Harbor Tunnel

Baltimore, MaryLand
The 1.4-mile, four-lane tunnel handled its first vehicles in November 1957. Today, traffic at the Harbor Tunnel totals nearly 23.6-million vehicles.

Harry-S-Truman-Birthplace

Harry S Truman Birthplace

Lamar, Missouri
Harry S. Truman, 33rd President of the United States, was born in this house on May 8, 1884. Truman attended the dedication of his birthplace as a Missouri State Historic Site on April 19, 1959.

Hawaii-State-Capitol

Hawaii State Capitol

Honolulu, Hawaii, 96813
The Hawaii State Capitol opened on March 15, 1969 and replaced the former statehouse, 'Iolani Palace. It is an American adaptation of the Bauhaus style called Hawaiian international architecture.

Henry-D.-Clayton-House

Henry D. Clayton House

, Barbour County, Alabama, 36016
This was the birthplace and home of Henry De Lamar Clayton, Jr., a legislator and judge. While serving in the U.S. Congress, he sponsored the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914. The plantation house was built by his father Henry DeLamar Clayton, a Confederat

Hollywood-Sign

Hollywood Sign

Los Angeles, California
The sign originally read "HOLLYWOODLAND," and its purpose was to advertise a new housing development in the hills above the Hollywood district of Los Angeles in 1923.

Homer-Laughlin-China-Company

Homer Laughlin China Company

Newell, Hancock County, West Virginia, 26050
Initially began as Laughlin Pottery in East Liverpool, Ohio, the company was started in 1871 by brothers Shakespeare and Homer Laughlin. By the late 1920s all production was centered at the West Virginia factory and the Ohio site was abandoned.

Hotel-Roosevelt

Hotel Roosevelt

Los Angeles, California
The hotel was named after President Theodore Roosevelt. On May 16, 1929, the first Academy Awards were presented at a private dinner held at the Roosevelt Hotel.

Huddleston-Farmhouse-Inn-Museum

Huddleston Farmhouse Inn Museum

Mount Auburn, Indiana
The Huddleston Farmhouse served as a rest stop for travelers using the National Road (Cumberland Road), one of the earliest highways built in America. The Quaker family of 11 who lived in the house provided stables, food and lodging.

Idaho-Potato-Museum

Idaho Potato Museum

Blackfoot, Bingham County, Idaho, 83221
An educational institution celebrating both the potato and its role in the economic growth of Idaho, the museum began in 1990 and is located at the site of a former Oregon Short Line Railroad Depot.

Idaho-State-Capitol

Idaho State Capitol

Boise, Ada County, Idaho, 83702
The sandstone and marble Capitol was completed in 1920. The design of the building was designed to look like the U.S. Capitol in Washington,D.C. Local sandstone from east Boise's Tablerock Quarry was used as well as convict labor.

Illinois-State-Capitol

Illinois State Capitol

Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, 62701
The Illinois capitol is the tallest non-skyscraper capitol, even exceeding the height of the United States Capitol in Washington, DC. The building itself is shaped like a Latin cross aligned to the major points of the compass.

Independence-Hall

Independence Hall

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Originally the home of the Pennsylvania Assembly and Supreme Court during the Colonial Era, the building was called the Pennsylvania State House. The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution were adopted and signed here.

Indiana-Statehouse

Indiana Statehouse

Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, 46204
The Indiana Statehouse is laid out in the shape of a cross. A large central rotunda with a glass domed ceiling connects the four wings. The structure is four stories high. Built in 1888, it is the fifth building to house the state government.

Ivy-Green

Ivy Green

Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama, 35674
Ivy Green is the name for the childhood home of Helen Keller. The house was built in 1820 and is a simple white clapboard house. The actual well pump where Helen Keller first communicated with Anne Sullivan is located at Ivy Green.

Jabez-Lamar-Monroe-Curry-Home

Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry Home

, Talladega County, Alabama
Curry was a lawyer, politician, and educator who encouraged the expansion and improvement of the public school system and the establishment of training schools for teachers throughout the south.

James-A.-Garfield-Memorial

James A. Garfield Memorial

Cleveland, Ohio
President and Mrs. Garfield are entombed in the lower level crypt, their coffins placed side by side and visible to cemetery visitors.

James-Dean-Memorial

James Dean Memorial

Cholame, California
Famous for his role in the movie "Rebel Without a Cause," James Dean was one of America's most famous teen idols. The irony that the racing enthusiast died in a car accident is reflected in the unique design of this memorial.

Jefferson-Memorial

Jefferson Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia
The Jefferson Memorial was officially dedicated on April 13, 1943 - the 200th anniversary of Thomas Jefferson's birthday.

Joan-of-Arc-Statue

Joan of Arc Statue

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19130
This sculpture originally stood at an intersection in Paris but was removed when a subway was constructed. It was placed here by the Fairmount Park Art Association as part of a movement to beautify the park with sculpture and landscaping.

Kansas-Cosmosphere-and-Space-Center

Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center

Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas, 67501
The Cosmosphere exhibits the 2nd largest collection of US space artifacts in the world (second only to the National Air and Space Museum), and the largest collection of Soviet space artifacts outside of Moscow.

Kansas-State-Capitol

Kansas State Capitol

Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, 66612
Home to one of the largest capitol domes in the United States, the Kansas dome is the only one in the United States that continues to offer dome tours. There are 296 steps leading up from the fifth floor to the top of the dome.

Kennedy-Space-Center

Kennedy Space Center

, Brevard County, Florida
The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is the NASA space vehicle launch facility (spaceport). The site is near Cape Canaveral, Florida. It is 34 mi long and around 6 mi wide, covering 219 square miles.

Kent-State-University-East-Liverpool-Campus

Kent State University East Liverpool Campus

East Liverpool, Columbiana County, Ohio, 43920
The East Liverpool Campus of Kent State occupies a downtown site overlooking the Ohio River. It is composed of the Main Building, Memorial Auditorium, Mary Patterson Building, and a Commons area.

Kentucky-State-Capitol

Kentucky State Capitol

Frankford, Franklin County, Kentucky, 40601
The capitol was designed by Frank Mills Andrews. He used the Beaux-Arts style and included many classical French interior designs. The staircases, for example, are replicas of those that appear in the Opéra Garnier in Paris.

Kenworthy-Hall-a.k.a.-Carlisle-Martin-House

Kenworthy Hall a.k.a. Carlisle-Martin House

, Perry County, Alabama
It is the only surviving residential example of Richard Upjohn's Italian villa style that was especially designed to suit the Southern climate and the plantation lifestyle. The building was designed and constructed for Edward Kenworthy Carlisle.

Korean-War-Veterans-Memorial

Korean War Veterans Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia, 20020
The memorial is in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. Within the triangle are 19 stainless steel statues designed by Frank Gaylord representing a squad on patrol.

Las-Vegas-Eiffel-Tower

Las Vegas Eiffel Tower

Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, 89109
This replica of the Eiffel Tower is 5/8ths of the original and is 540 feel tall (164.6 m). It includes glass elevators, a restaurant and an observation deck.

Liberty-Bell

Liberty Bell

Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania
The Liberty Bell rang out for important events during the Revolutionary War and America's Federal period, but did not acquire its famous name until the 1830's, when it became a symbol for the abolitionist movement.

Liberty-Memorial

Liberty Memorial

Kansas City, Missouri
When the Liberty Memorial opened on November 11, 1926 , President Calvin Coolidge delivered the dedication speech. The memorial is home to the National World War I Museum, which opened on December 2, 2006.

Lightning-Bolt-Sculpture:-A-Tribute-to-Benjamin-Franklin

Lightning Bolt Sculpture: A Tribute to Benjamin Franklin

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Isamu Noguchi designed this 60-ton stainless steel sculpture. It is 101-feet tall. The sculpture depicts a bolt of lighting, a kite, and a key at the base and is meant to commemorate Franklin's famous experiment.

Lincoln-Memorial

Lincoln Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia
The Lincoln Memorial replicates the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln.

Little-Bighorn-Battlefield-National-Monument

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Crow Agency, Montana
This monument is dedicated to the men who died in the battle of the Little Bighorn. It was build in 1881 making it the oldest national monument in the country.

Little-Rock-Central-High-School

Little Rock Central High School

Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas
In 1957, nine African-American students, known as the Little Rock Nine, were denied entrance to the school in defiance of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling ordering integration of public schools.

Longaberger-Company-Corporate-Headquarters

Longaberger Company Corporate Headquarters

Newark, Ohio
If you have never heard of the Longaberger Company, their corporate headquarters building should give you a good idea of what they manufacture.

Louisiana-State-Capitol

Louisiana State Capitol

Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge County, Louisiana, 70802
At 450 feet (137 meters) tall, with 34 stories, it is the tallest capitol building in the United States, the tallest building in Baton Rouge, and the seventh-tallest building in Louisiana.

LOVE-Sculpture

LOVE Sculpture

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Robert Indiana's famous LOVE sculpture was placed in Philadelphia's JFK Plaza in 1976 as part of the Bicentennial celebration. The artwork has been duplicated countless times as a sculpture and in print.

Lowell-Observatory

Lowell Observatory

Flagstaff, Coconino County, Arizona, 86001
Lowell Observatory is among the oldest observatories in the United States. It was founded in 1894 by astronomer Percival Lowell, and the Observatory's original 24-inch (0.61 m) Alvan Clark Telescope is still in use today for public education.

Lucy-the-Elephant

Lucy the Elephant

Margate, New Jersey
Lucy was in such bad shape in the 1960's that she was scheduled for demolition, but the "Save Lucy" campaign raised enough money to have her restored and moved to her present location. She became a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Maine-State-House

Maine State House

Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, 04333
About 150 feet (46 m) in length, including the central portion with columns and cupola and two wings extending north and south, the building's cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1829.

Mall-of-America-(The-MegaMall)

Mall of America (The MegaMall)

Bloomington, Minnesota
Mall of America has a gross area of 4.2 million sq ft. (390,000 m²), with over 520 stores. The Mall is organized into 4 different zones, each with its own decorative style.

Man-Full-of-Trouble-Tavern

Man Full of Trouble Tavern

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Constructed in 1759, Man Full of Trouble is the only remaining pre-revolutionary tavern building in Philadelphia.

Marine-Corps-War-Memorial

Marine Corps War Memorial

Rosslyn, Virginia
Although the Marine Corps War Memorial depicts one of the famous moments of World War II, the memorial is dedicated to all Marines who have given their lives in the service of the United States since 1775.

Marshall-Space-Flight-Center-(MSFC)

Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, 35801
The original home of NASA, it was here that President Dwight D. Eisenhower announced the formation of the organization on July 1, 1960. The Space Flight Center is named in honor of General George C. Marshall.

Maryland-State-House

Maryland State House

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, MaryLand, 21401
The Maryland State House is the oldest state capitol in continuous legislative use, dating to 1772. It houses the Maryland General Assembly. The capitol has the distinction of being topped by the largest wooden dome built without nails in the nation.

Massachusetts-State-House

Massachusetts State House

Boston, Massachusetts, 02133
The building is situated on 6.7 acres (27,000 m2) of land on top of Beacon Hill in Boston. The dome is topped with a pine cone, symbolizing both the importance of Boston's lumber industry in the early colonial days.

Memorial-Hall

Memorial Hall

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19131
Memorial Hall was built as an art gallery for the 1876 Centennial Exposition. It was the original home to the Philadelphia Art Museum. It was one of America's first examples of Beaux-Arts architecture.

Merchants'-Exchange-Building

Merchants' Exchange Building

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Upon its completion in 1834, the building became the financial center for Philadelphia, housing commercial houses, marine insurance companies, the Philadelphia Board of Trade, and the Philadelphia Stock Exchange.

Miami-Seaquarium

Miami Seaquarium

Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 33149
The park was the first major marine park attraction in South Florida. Its grand opening was in 1955. In addition to the marine mammals, the Miami Seaquarium also houses fish, sharks, sea turtles, birds, reptiles and manatees.

Michigan-State-Capitol

Michigan State Capitol

Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan, 48933
The Michigan State Capitol is 267 feet (81.3 m) from the ground to the tip of finial/spire above the dome. The building is 420 feet (130 m) and two inches (128 m) long and 273 feet (83 m) and 11 inches (83.4 m) wide.

Minnesota-State-Capitol

Minnesota State Capitol

St. Paul, Minnesota, 55155
The building was modeled after Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome. The unsupported marble dome is the second largest in the world, after Saint Peter's. Construction of the building was completed in 1905.

Mississippi-State-Capitol

Mississippi State Capitol

Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi, 39201
Known as the "New Capitol," this landmark was completed in 1903 as a replacement for the "Old Capitol" which now serves as a museum. The building currently is home to the state legislature and Governor's office.

Missouri-State-Capitol

Missouri State Capitol

Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri, 65101
The Missouri State Capitol is notable for its architectural features, including its eight 48-foot (15 m) columns on the south portico and six 40-foot (12 m) columns on the north side; its 30-foot (9 m)-wide grand stairway and its bronze front doors.

Mizner-Park

Mizner Park

Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, Florida, 33432
Mizner Park is a suburban lifestyle center (boutique mall) located in downtown Boca Raton, Florida. Besides upscale shops, Mizner is comprised of rental apartments and offices.

Montana-State-Capitol

Montana State Capitol

Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Montana, 59601
The building, constructed of Montana sandstone and granite, is in Greek neoclassical architectural style. The exterior of the dome is covered in copper. Atop the dome is a statue of a woman affectionately dubbed "Lady Liberty."

Mount-de-Chantal-Visitation-Academy

Mount de Chantal Visitation Academy

Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia, 26003
Founded in 1848, Mount de Chantal Visitation Academy is a private Catholic school. Grades seven through twelve are all female and the Montessori and Elementary schools are co-ed. The school has announced that it will cease operations on May 31, 2008.

Mount-Rushmore-National-Memorial

Mount Rushmore National Memorial

near Keystone, South Dakota
One of the most recognized and controversial landmarks in the United States, Mt. Rushmore features the faces of Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Lincoln.

Municipal-Services-Building

Municipal Services Building

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19102
Because City Hall and its annex could not hold all the offices necessary for the city's government, the Municipal Services Building was constructed to house many of the city's administrative offices and services.

Museum-of-Ceramics

Museum of Ceramics

East Liverpool, Columbiana County, Ohio, 43920
Operated by the Ohio Historical Society, the Museum of Ceramics has the country's largest public display of Lotus Ware. It occupies the former city post office, which was built in 1909.

Museum-of-Fine-Arts

Museum of Fine Arts

Boston, Massachusetts, 02115
The Boston Museum of Fine Arts has over 400,000 objects in its collection, the second largest permanent museum collection in the United States after the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

National-Constitution-Center

National Constitution Center

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Located within Independence National Historical Park, the Center is dedicated to the history and continuing relevance of the Constitution of the United States. The museum contains exhibits, artifacts and a theater.

National-Memorial-Arch

National Memorial Arch

Valley Forge National Historical Park, Pennsylvania
The Arch was erected in 1910 by an act of the 61st Congress. Designed by University of Pennsylvania professor Paul Philippe Cret, the Arch is built in a style similar to the Arch of Titus in Rome.

National-Monument-to-the-Forefathers-(Pilgrim-Monument)

National Monument to the Forefathers (Pilgrim Monument)

Plymouth, Massachusetts
It's not an official National Monument, but it was renamed to show that it is dedicated to the entire nation and to keep it from being confused with another monument in the same town called "Pilgrim Monument."

National-World-War-II-Memorial

National World War II Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia
The National World War II Memorial commemorates the sacrifice and celebrates the victory of the WWII generation. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Mall’s central axis.

Nebraska-State-Capitol

Nebraska State Capitol

Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska, 68508
The Indiana limestone structure draws on both Classical and Gothic architectural traditions, but represents major innovations in state capitol design. The structure is nicknamed "The Tower of the Plains."

Nevada-State-Capitol

Nevada State Capitol

Carson City, Nevada, 89701
Constructed between 1869 and 1871, the Nevada State Capitol served all three branches of the state government for over 50 years. Today, the Capitol continues to serve the Governor, and contains historical exhibits on the second floor.

New-Hampshire-State-House

New Hampshire State House

Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, 03301
Completed in 1819, the New Hampshire State House is the oldest state capitol in which the legislature meets in its original chambers.

New-Jersey-State-House

New Jersey State House

Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, 08608
This is the second oldest state house in continuous legislative use in the United States. Unlike most capitols in the U.S., the building is shaped like a sideways H, with a golden dome over the cross-bar of the H.

New-Mexico-Museum-of-Natural-History-and-Science

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 87104
The Museum houses changing exhibits, a cafe, a gift store, and the Lockheed Martin DynaTheather, a giant screen theater similar to IMAX. Permanent exhibits include a "journey through time", covering the birth of the Universea, a planetarium and two floors

New-Mexico-State-Capitol

New Mexico State Capitol

Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 87501
Often called the Roundhouse the New Mexico capitol building is the only round state capitol in the United States. The building was designed to resemble the Zia Sun Symbol when viewed from above.

New-York-State-Capitol

New York State Capitol

Albany, New York, 12224
The Capitol was constructed between 1867 and 1899 and inspired by the City Hall in Paris, France. The building is constructed in both the Romanesque and Renaissance revival styles.

North-Conway-Railroad-Station

North Conway Railroad Station

North Conway, Carroll County, New Hampshire, 03860
This station marked the northern terminus of the Conway Branch of the Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway Railroad. The Conway Scenic Railroad restored the building in 1974. Today, a gift shop occupies the old waiting room.

North-Dakota-State-Capitol

North Dakota State Capitol

Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, 58505
The State Capitol building is a 241.67 feet (73.7 m) tall, 19-story, Art Deco skyscraper. It is the tallest building in North Dakota and is known as the Skyscraper on the Prairie.

Northern-Pacific-Depot---Hinckley-Fire-Museum

Northern Pacific Depot - Hinckley Fire Museum

Hinckley, Pine County, Minnesota, 55037
The building was originally built by the St. Paul and Duluth Railroad, later the Northern Pacific Railway. The depot is now the Hinckley Fire Museum. The museum interprets the history of the fire that destroyed six towns.

O'Hare-International-Airport-(ORD)

O'Hare International Airport (ORD)

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60666
Chicago O'Hare International Airport provides 186 aircraft gates throughout four Terminals and nine concourses. It is the largest hub of United Airlines and the second-largest hub of American Airlines.

Oklahoma-City-National-Memorial

Oklahoma City National Memorial

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Taking up 3.3 acres, the Oklahoma City National Memorial is the largest memorial of its kind in the United States. It was built in memory of those who died in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

Old-Army-Navy-Hospital

Old Army Navy Hospital

Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas, 71901
Now home to Arkansas' Department of Rehabilitation, the Army-Navy Hospital opened in November of 1933. Several hospitals had been built along Bathhouse Row to take advantage of the hot springs.

Old-City-Hall-Southern-Market-(Museum-of-Mobile)

Old City Hall Southern Market (Museum of Mobile)

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, 36602
This is a historic complex of adjoining buildings that currently houses the Museum of Mobile. The complex was built from 1855 to 1857 to serve as a city hall and as a marketplace.

Old-State-House

Old State House

Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, 06103
Completed in 1796, the building was the state capitol until 1878. Exhibits focus on the history of Hartford and important events in Connecticut history.. The third floor of the building houses the Museum of Natural and Other Curiosities.

Old-Town-Albuquerque

Old Town Albuquerque

Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 87104
A popular shopping and tourist destination, Old Town comprises about ten blocks of historic adobe buildings grouped around a central plaza. Many of the buildings are houses that have been converted into restaurants and small art and souvenir shops.

Owen-J.-

Owen J. "Donie" Bush Stadium

Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana
This endangered landmark was home to the Indianapolis Indians, a minor league ball for many decades. It was also home to a few Negro League teams, as well as a Continental Football League team, the Indianapolis Capitols.

OZ-Museum

OZ Museum

Wamego, Pottawatomie County, Kansas, 66547
The OZ Museum was founded in April 2004 and houses one of the largest public displays of Oz memorabilia in existence. The museum houses memorabilia from 1939 MGM musical, earlier silent films, as well as "The Wiz."

Paramount-Pictures

Paramount Pictures

Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, 90038
Founded on May 8, 1912, Paramount is the oldest functioning movie studio in the United States. It produced many of the early movie stars including Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Gloria Swanson, and Rudolph Valentino.

Paris-Las-Vegas

Paris Las Vegas

Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, 89109
Owned and operated by Harrah's Entertainment, this hotel-casino's theme is the city of Paris in France. It contains replicas of many famous landmarks in Paris, including a 540 ft. (164.6 m) replica of the Eiffel Tower.

Pennsylvania-Academy-of-Fine-Arts

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts was founded in 1805 by painter and scientist Charles Willson Peale, sculptor William Rush, and other artists and business leaders. It is the oldest art museum and school in the nation.

Pennsylvania-Eastern-State-Penitentiary

Pennsylvania Eastern State Penitentiary

Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, 19130
Designed by John Haviland and opened in 1829, Eastern State is considered to be the world's first true penitentiary.

Pennsylvania-Hospital

Pennsylvania Hospital

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19107
The Pennsylvania Hospital was founded in 1751 by Benjamin Franklin and Dr. Thomas Bond, making it the oldest hospital in the United States. The Pine Building was the original hospital and was based on the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Peoria-Waterworks-Purification-Facility

Peoria Waterworks Purification Facility

Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois
This water purification facility was built in 1890, designed in Romanesque Revival style .It first supplied water to the City Of Peoria on Dec 1st, 1890 and is listed on the US National Register of Historic places..If you look close you will see Gargoyles

Philadelphia-Bourse

Philadelphia Bourse

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Philadelphia Bourse was the first commodities exchange in the United States. Completed in 1895, the building was one of the first steel-framed buildings to be constructed in the city. Today, it houses a shopping mall and office complex.

Philadelphia-City-Hall

Philadelphia City Hall

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The world's tallest masonry building, Philadelphia's City Hall is 548 feet (167 m) tall including the statue of William Penn. The statue is the tallest atop any building in the world.

Philadelphia-International-Airport-(PHL)

Philadelphia International Airport (PHL)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19153
PHL is the 10th busiest airport in the world in terms of aircraft activity. The airport is the primary international hub of US Airways. It has seven terminal buildings, which are divided into seven lettered concourses.

Philadelphia-Museum-of-Art

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19130
The Art Museum stands on 10 acres that was formerly the reservoir for the Fairmount Water Works. It is one of the largest art museums in the country and holds over 225,000 objects.

Philadelphia-Museum-of-Art:-Ruth-and-Raymond-G.-Perelman-Building

Philadelphia Museum of Art: Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19130
Formerly the Fidelity Life Insurance Building, the Philadelphia Museum of Art bought the property and renovated it for use as an annex.

Philadelphia-Vietnam-Veterans-Memorial

Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Completed in 1987, the memorial is located in Philly's Penn's Landing area just across from I-95. This section of I-95 is also called the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway.

Phipps-Conservatory-and-Botanical-Gardens

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 15213
The gardens were founded in 1893 by steel and real-estate magnate Henry Phipps as a gift to the City of Pittsburgh. It contains formal gardens and various species of exotic plants.

Physick-House

Physick House

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The building was once the home of Philip Syng Physick, who is known as the father of American surgery. From his home medical office, he treated many well-known patients including Dolly Madison, President Andrew Jackson and Chief Justice John Marshall.

Pickens-County-Courthouse

Pickens County Courthouse

Carrollton, Pickens County, Alabama, 35447
This courthouse is famous for a ghostly image that can be seen in one of its windows. The image is said to be the face of Henry Wells, who was falsely accused of burning down the town's previous courthouse, and lynched on a stormy night in 1878.

Pilgrim-Monument

Pilgrim Monument

Provincetown, Massachusetts
The Pilgrim Monument was built between 1907 and 1910 to commemorate the first landfall of the Pilgrims in 1620 and the signing in Provincetown Harbor of the Mayflower Compact.

Pioneer-Settlement-for-Creative-Arts

Pioneer Settlement for Creative Arts

Barberville, Volusia County, Florida, 32105
Anchored around the Central School of Barberville, many historic structures have been moved to the grounds. Other structures have been built on site to demonstrate historical trades.

Pittsburgh-International-Airport-(PIT)

Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT)

Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 15231
Pittsburgh International is the second busiest passenger airport in Pennsylvania and 42nd busiest in the United States in passenger travel. In land area, it occupies more than 12,900 acres (45 km²), making it the fourth largest airport in the nation.

Planet-Hollywood-Resort-and-Casino

Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino

Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, 89109
The resort was formerly known as The Aladdin. The casino was originally opened in 1963 as the Tally-Ho. It was later called King's Crown in 1964.

Point-Montara-Light

Point Montara Light

Moss Beach, San Mateo County, California, 94038
Established in February 1875, the current tower was first erected in 1881 in Massachusetts as the Mayo Beach Lighthouse. It was moved and rebuilt as the Point Montara Light station in 1928.

Ponce-de-Leon-Inlet-Light

Ponce de Leon Inlet Light

Ponce Inlet, Volusia County, Florida, 32127
Originally called Mosquito Inlet Light, the lighthouse at Ponce de Leon Inlet, at 175 feet in height, is the tallest lighthouse in Florida and the one of the tallest in the United States.

Randy's-Donuts

Randy's Donuts

Inglewood, California
Randy's is one of four surviving buildings that feature the giant donut sculptures created by Robert Graham. The drive-in donut shop is open 24 hours a day.

Reading-Terminal

Reading Terminal

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19107
The Reading Terminal is a complex composed of three parts: the Reading Terminal Headhouse, the Reading Terminal Trainshed, and the Reading Terminal Market. The station opened on January 29, 1893.

Republic-Plaza

Republic Plaza

Denver, Colorado
Rising 717 feet (218 m), the Republic Plaza is currently the tallest building in Denver, the state of Colorado and the entire Rocky Mountain region of the United States. It was built in 1984, and contains 56 floors.

Robert-S.-Abbott-House

Robert S. Abbott House

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois
From 1926 until his death in 1940, Robert S. Abbott, the most successful Black publisher of his era and founder of the Chicago Defender newspaper, lived in part of this large Queen Anne brick duplex.

Robinson-House

Robinson House

Claymont, New Castle County, Delaware, 19703
The Robinson House was built on the site of the original settlement on Naaman’s Creek in 1723. George Washington, General Anthony Wayne, the Marquis de Lafayette, and “Light Horse” Harry Lee were all guests at the Robinson House.

Rock-and-Roll-Hall-of-Fame

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Cleveland, Ohio
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is dedicated to some of the best-known and most influential artists, producers, and other people who have influenced the music industry, particularly in the area of rock and roll.

Rodin-Museum

Rodin Museum

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19103
The Museum was the gift of movie-theater magnate Jules Mastbaum and opened in 1929. It holds the largest collection of Rodin’s work outside of Paris.

Roman-Catholic-High-School-for-Boys

Roman Catholic High School for Boys

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19107
Roman opened in 1890 as an all-male high school and is still only open to boys. It was founded by Thomas E. Cahill, a nineteenth century Philadelphia merchant. It is the oldest free Diocesan Catholic high school in North America.

Saint-Bridget's-Roman-Catholic-Church

Saint Bridget's Roman Catholic Church

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19129
This gothic style church serves the East Falls neighborhood.

Saint-Francis-Xavier-Church

Saint Francis Xavier Church

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19130
This romanesque style church was completed in 1898 to replace an older church for the parish. The gabled tower is 152 feet high, and the large circular stained glass window above the central entrance is 22 feet in diameter.

Salinas-Pueblo-Missions-National-Monument

Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument

Gran Quivira, New Mexico
These austere yet beautiful reminders of this earliest contact between Pueblo Indians and Spanish Colonials consists of the ruins of four mission churches: Quarai, Abó, Gran Quivira and the partially excavated pueblo of Las Humanas.

Samuel-Powel-House

Samuel Powel House

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Samuel Powel served as the last mayor of Philadelphia under English rule and was the first mayor of the city after the creation of the United States. The house is considered one of the best existing examples of a Georgian Colonial townhouse.

San-Jacinto-Monument

San Jacinto Monument

La Porte, Harris County, Texas
The San Jacinto Monument is a 570 foot (173.7 m) high column topped with a 220 ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. It is the second tallest monument in the United States.

Sears-Tower

Sears Tower

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60606
The Sears Tower has been the tallest building in the United States since 1973 and was the world's tallest building from 1973 to 1998.

Second-Bank-of-the-United-States

Second Bank of the United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Second Bank was incorporated in 1816. Designed by William Strickland, this building, built between 1819 and 1824, is one of the finest examples of Greek Revival architecture in the United States.

Sixteenth-Street-Baptist-Church

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35203
Called the First Colored Baptist Church of Birmingham when it was founded in 1873, this was the first black church to organize in Birmingham. In September 1963, the church was the target of a racially-motivated bombing that killed four girls.

Sloss-Furnaces

Sloss Furnaces

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35222
Sloss Furnaces was operated as a pig iron-producing blast furnace from 1882 to 1971. After closing it became one of the first industrial sites in the U.S. to be preserved for public use. The site currently serves as an interpretive museum of industry.

Smith-Civil-War-Memorial

Smith Civil War Memorial

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19131
The Smith Civil War Memorial was erected between 1897 and 1912 under a bequest of Richard Smith. It features several statues of the military leaders of the war and a whispering bench.

Society-Hill-Synagogue

Society Hill Synagogue

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Society Hill Synagogue, built in 1829 as the Spruce Street First Baptist Church, is home to a Conservative congregation. It was designed by Thomas U. Walter, the architect responsible for the Capitol dome and wings.

Soldiers-and-Sailors-Monument-(Indianapolis)

Soldiers and Sailors Monument (Indianapolis)

Indianapolis, Indiana
The Soldiers and Sailors Monument was designed by German architect Bruno Schmitz, and was completed in 1901. The basement of the monument is the Colonel Eli Lilly Museum, a museum of Indiana history during the American Civil War.

South-Street

South Street

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19147
"Where do all the hippies meet?" The stretch of South Street between Front Street and Seventh Street is known for its "bohemian" atmosphere and its wide variety of shops and eateries.

Space-Needle

Space Needle

Seattle, Washington
Built for the 1962 World's Fair, the Space Needle features an observation deck at 520 feet (160 m), the SkyCity restaurant at 500 feet (152 m), and a gift shop.

Stan-Hywet-Hall-and-Gardens

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

Akron, Summit County, Ohio, 44303
The estate was built between 1912 and 1915 for F. A. Seiberling, founder of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. He gave it the name Stan Hywet, Old English for stone quarry. It is now a historic house museum and gardens, open seasonally to the public.

Statue-of-Don-Vicente-Martinez-Ybor

Statue of Don Vicente Martinez Ybor

Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, 33605
Don Vicente Martinez Ybor established the first cigar factory in Tampa, beginning what was to be the city's major export for decades. Ybor's friend, Gavino Gutierrez, laid out a street grid for the area which became Ybor City.

Statue-of-Liberty-(Liberty-Enlightening-the-World)

Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World)

Jersey City, New York County, New York
The sculptor was Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, the designer of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, designed the internal framework that supports the copper plates that make up the statue.

Tastykake-Baking-Company

Tastykake Baking Company

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19129
Founded in 1914, Tastykake has become a Philadelphia tradition. The current building is a six-story manufacturing facility that was built in 1922 and utilizes 15 production lines. The company plans to move to the Navy Yard in the future.

TD-Banknorth-Sports-Center

TD Banknorth Sports Center

Hamden, Connecticut
Quinnipiac University's state-of-the-art sports center opened on January 27, 2007. It consists of two arenas, one for basketball and the other for ice hockey. The building was one of the first constructed for the York Hill Campus.

Teapot-Dome-Service-Station

Teapot Dome Service Station

Zillah, Yakima County, Washington
Unique structures like this teapot were popular along America's roadways in the 1920's and 1930's. This service station building was constructed in amused memory of the Teapot Dome Scandal during the administration of Warren G. Harding.

Tennessee-State-Capitol

Tennessee State Capitol

Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, 37243
The cornerstone for the building was laid on July 4, 1845, and construction finished in 1859. The Capitol was designed by noted architect William Strickland, who is buried in the North Wing.

The-Alamo

The Alamo

San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
The full name of the site was San Antonio de Valero Mission. It was build by the Spanish in the 1700's for the education and conversion of local Native Americans.

The-Breakers

The Breakers

Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island, 02840
Designed by Richard Morris Hunt for Cornelius Vanderbelt II, The Breakers is an Italian Renaissance mansion that would cost over 150 million dollars if it were built today. The four story building has 70 rooms built around a central Great Hall.

The-Jamie-L.-Whitten-Building-(USDA-Headquarters)

The Jamie L. Whitten Building (USDA Headquarters)

Washington, District of Columbia, 20250
It took nearly 30 years to complete construction of the building because of politics, World War I, and a lack of funding.

The-Maryland-Zoo-in-Baltimore

The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore

Baltimore, MaryLand, 21217
Formerly the Baltimore Zoo, the landmark is the third oldest zoo in the United States.

The-Pentagon

The Pentagon

Arlington, Virginia
Headquarters of the Department of Defense for the United States of America, the Pentagon is one of the world's largest office buildings. It has three times the floor space of the Empire State Building.

The-Union-League-of-Philadelphia

The Union League of Philadelphia

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19102
The Union League was established in 1862 to promote loyalty to the Union and the policies of Abraham Lincoln. The classic French Renaissance-styled League House dates back to 1865 and is listed in the National Historic Register.

The-Washington-Monument

The Washington Monument

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19130
This 1897 work by Rudolf Siemering features a majestic statue of Washington along with sculptures of animals and allegorical figures of rivers. Other features include fountains, stairs and plaques.

The-White-House

The White House

Washington, District of Columbia, 20500
Originally referred to as the "Presidential Mansion," or "President's House,", there are several stories as to how the building came to be called "The White House." The name became official during the administration of Theodore Roosevelt.

Third-Street-Bridge

Third Street Bridge

Delavan, Tazewell County, Illinois
Built in the 1870's and moved to Delavan in 1907, this bridge is the oldest metal truss brridge in Illinois.

Tomb-of-the-Unknown-Soldier

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier honors the thousands of soldiers who died during the American Revolutionary War, many of whom were buried in mass graves in the park. Built in 1954, it features an eternal flame and a statue of George Washington.

Tomb-of-the-Unknowns

Tomb of the Unknowns

Arlington, Virginia
The Tomb of the Unknowns has been guarded continuously, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, since July 2, 1937. Inclement weather does not cause the watch to cease.

Tower-of-the-Americas

Tower of the Americas

San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, 78205
Tower of the Americas is a 750 feet (229 meter) high observation tower with a restaurant. Designed by San Antonio architect O'Neil Ford, the tower was built as the theme structure of the 1968 World's Fair, HemisFair '68.

Town-Center-at-Boca-Raton

Town Center at Boca Raton

Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, Florida, 33431
Construction on the Town Center Mall started in 1979, and it officially opened with in 1980. Throughout 1999 and 2000, the older portions of the mall were redeveloped, and a new area called "The Terrace" has recently opened.

Tripler-Army-Medical-Center

Tripler Army Medical Center

Honolulu, Hawaii
Located on the slopes of Moanalua Ridge overlooking the Honolulu neighborhoods of Moanalua and Salt Lake, Tripler Army Medical Center's massive coral pink structure can be seen from any point in the Honolulu District.

Twentieth-Century-Fox-Studios

Twentieth Century Fox Studios

Los Angeles, California, 90035
Fox is one of the six major American film studios. The company was founded in 1935, as the result of a merger of two entities, Fox Film Corporation and Twentieth Century Pictures.

U.S.-Snagboat-Montgomery

U.S. Snagboat Montgomery

Carrollton, Pickens County, Alabama, 35447
Montgomery is one of the few surviving steam-powered sternwheelers in the United States and is one of only two surviving United States Army Corps of Engineers snagboats. It was built in 1925.

U.S.S.-Alabama-(BB-60)

U.S.S. Alabama (BB-60)

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama
A South Dakota-class battleship, the U.S.S. Alabama served in World War II. The vessel is currently a museum and memorial docked in Mobile Bay.

U.S.S.-Arizona-Memorial

U.S.S. Arizona Memorial

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
The memorial, dedicated in 1962, spans the sunken hull of the battleship Arizona without touching it. The Navy stipulated that the memorial be in the form of a bridge floating above the ship and accommodate 200 people.

U.S.S.-Olympia

U.S.S. Olympia

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Olympia is the sole floating survivor of the U.S. Navy's Spanish-American War fleet. It was from her deck, during the Battle of Manila Bay, that Commodore George Dewey spoke the famous words "You may fire when ready, Gridley."

Union-Bank-Building

Union Bank Building

Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, 32399
Opened in 1841, the Union Bank Building is said to be the oldest surviving bank building in the state. It is now an extension of the Florida A&M University Black Archives, Research Center and Museum.

Union-Station-and-Trainshed

Union Station and Trainshed

Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, 36104
Montgomery Union Station and its trainshed were built by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad and opened in 1898. In 1979, Union Station was closed, and after a period of disuse, Union Station was renovated for commercial tenants.

UniSource-Energy-Tower

UniSource Energy Tower

Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, 85701
The UniSource Energy Tower is the tallest building in Tucson and 13th tallest in Arizona. The building is 330 feet tall (100.584 meters) and 25 floors. It was designed by Fentress Bradburn Architects Ltd. in 1988.

United-States-Botanic-Garden

United States Botanic Garden

Washington, District of Columbia, 20024
The botanic garden is run by the Congress of the United States and is supervised by the Architect of the Capitol, the person responsible for maintaining the grounds of the United States Capitol.

United-States-Capitol

United States Capitol

Washington, District of Columbia, 20515
Home to the United States Congress, the Legislative Branch of the government, the Capitol has a central section featuring the famous rotunda and dome. The North wing houses the Senate, while the South wing is home to the House of Representatives.

United-States-Mint

United States Mint

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Completed in 1969, this is the fourth building to house the nation's first mint. Visitors can take a self-guided tour of the minting process, see the original coining press used in 1792 and purchase commemorative coins in the gift shop.

University-of-Alabama

University of Alabama

Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, 35487
Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. Its athletic teams are nicknamed the "Crimson Tide" because crimson is one of the school colors. UA is composed of a campus of approximately 1,000 acres (4 km²).

University-of-Alabama-at-Birmingham

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35294
UAB began in 1936 as the Birmingham Extension Center of the University of Alabama. Highly renowned for its medical research and natural sciences programs, it is one of the larger research institutions in the Southeast.

University-of-Alabama-in-Huntsville-(UAH)

University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH)

Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, 35899
UAH is renowned for its engineering and science programs, such as astrophysics and atmospheric science. Scientists at UAH managed the first "commercial," non-government rocket programs in the U.S.

University-of-Phoenix-Stadium

University of Phoenix Stadium

Glendale, Maricopa County, Arizona, 85305
University of Phoenix Stadium is a multipurpose stadium, Its primary tenants are the Arizona Cardinals of the NFL and the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl. It is the location for Superbowl XLII.

USS-Drum-(SS-228)

USS Drum (SS-228)

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama
The U.S.S. Drum is a Gato class submarine that served in World War II. It sank several Japanese ships, carried out photo reconnaissance, and provided pilot rescue and reconnaissance for the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

Valley-Forge-National-Historical-Park

Valley Forge National Historical Park

Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
Famous as the camp for the Continental Army during the winter of 1777 - 1778, the park contains Washington's Headquarters, several monuments, reconstructed campsites and a visitor center.

Venetian-Resort-Hotel-Casino

Venetian Resort Hotel Casino

Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, 89109
The Venetian stands on the site of the Sands Hotel, which was imploded on November 26, 1996. It officially opened on May 3, 1999. Built at a cost of $1.5 billion, it is one of the most expensive resorts of its kind ever built.

Vermont-State-House

Vermont State House

Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, 05633
The Vermont State House is the capitol and seat of Vermont General Assembly. The current Greek Revival structure is the third building on the same site to serve as the State House. It was designed in 1857 and opened in 1859.

Vietnam-Veterans-Memorial

Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia
The names of the nearly 58,000 Americans who died in Vietnam or who remain unaccounted for are inscribed on the walls in chronological order.

Vietnam-Women's-Memorial

Vietnam Women's Memorial

Washington, District of Columbia
During the Vietnam War, over a quarter of a million women volunteered to serve in Vietnam as nurses and other support personnel. This memorial is dedicated to those women.

Vulcan-Statue

Vulcan Statue

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35209
At 56 foot (17 m) tall, the Vulcan statue is the largest cast iron statue in the world. It is the largest statue ever constructed in the United States. It is the second-largest statue standing in the United States behind the Statue of Liberty.

Wainwright-Building

Wainwright Building

St. Louis, Missouri, 63101
Built in 1891 and Designed by Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan, this 10-story red-brick office building is among the first skyscrapers in the world. Its steel frame and intricate terra cotta ornament in vertical bands emphasizes its height.

Walt-Disney-World-Resort

Walt Disney World Resort

Lake Buena Vista, Orange County, Florida
Walt Disney World Resort includes The Magic Kingdom, EPCOT, Disney Hollywood Studios, Disney's Animal Kingdom and 32 resorts and hotels that are located on the Walt Disney World property.

Washington-Monument

Washington Monument

Washington, District of Columbia
The monument is among the world's tallest masonry structures, standing 555 feet (169.29 m) in height and made of marble, granite, and sandstone. It was designed by Robert Mills, a prominent American architect of the 1840s.

Washington-Monument-(Baltimore)

Washington Monument (Baltimore)

Baltimore, MaryLand
Designed by Robert Mills who also designed the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., construction began in 1815 and was completed by 1829.

Washington-Monument-State-Park

Washington Monument State Park

, Washington County, MaryLand
This park is not named for the famous monument in Washington, D.C., but for a 34 feet tall tower on the peak of South Mountain. The rough stone tower was the first monument in the United States dedicated to George Washington.

Washington-National-Cathedral

Washington National Cathedral

Washington, District of Columbia, 20016
Officially called the Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, the National Cathedral was designated by Congress as the non-denominational National House of Prayer. It is the sixth largest cathedral in the world and second largest in the U.S.A.

Washington-Square

Washington Square

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Washington Square was originally called Southeast Square and was one of the original parks created by William Penn in his plan for Philadelphia.

Waverly-Hills-Sanatorium

Waverly Hills Sanatorium

Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, 40272
Opened in 1926 for tuberculosis patients, the hospital was often overcrowded. It was also used as a geriatrics hospital, but was closed in 1981 allegedly due to patient abuse. It is claimed to be the most haunted hospital in the eastern United States.

Wells-Fargo-Center

Wells Fargo Center

Denver, Colorado, 80203
The building has a unique type of architecture and is known as the "Cash Register Building" and sometimes as the "Mailbox Building." This building is 698 feet (213 meters) in height and has 52 floors.

West-Virginia-State-Penitentiary

West Virginia State Penitentiary

Moundsville, Marshall County, West Virginia, 26041
This gothic structure operated as a penitentiary from 1876 to 1995. Courts ruled that the 5 x 7-foot (2.1 m) cells were cruel and unusual punishment and the prison was closed. The site is now maintained as a tourist attraction and training facility.

Winterthur-Museum

Winterthur Museum

Winterthur, Delaware
The museum is the former home of the Dupont family and contains one of the finest collections of Americana to be found anywhere. The buildings and grounds were designed by the DuPonts to look like an English country estate.

Wisconsin-State-Capitol

Wisconsin State Capitol

Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, 53702
Completed in 1917, the building is the fifth to serve as the Wisconsin capitol since the first territorial legislature convened in 1836. The Wisconsin State Capitol is the tallest building in Madison.

Woolworth-Building

Woolworth Building

New York, New York, 10007
The Woolworth Building, at fifty-seven stories, is one of the oldest skyscrapers in New York City. It is still one of the fifty tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the twenty tallest buildings in New York City.

World's-Largest-Teapot

World's Largest Teapot

Chester, Hancock County, West Virginia, 26034
Originally a giant Hires Root Beer barrel, the landmark was brought to Chester in 1938 and converted to a teapot. At the time, Chester and the surrounding communities were home to the largest pottery industry in the world.

World's-Tallest-Thermometer

World's Tallest Thermometer

Baker, San Bernardino County, California
This 134 feet tall electric thermometer was built in 1991 as a tribute to the record temperature of 134 degrees Fahrenheit (57 degrees Celsius) recorded in nearby Death Valley on July 10, 1913.

Yale-University

Yale University

New Haven, Connecticut, 06520
This famous and prestigious university was founded in 1701 as the Collegiate School. It is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and is a member of the Ivy League.

Ybor-City

Ybor City

Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, 33605
Ybor City is a historic neighborhood located just northeast of downtown Tampa. It is known as Tampa's Latin Quarter. Portions of the old neighborhood have been designated as a National Historic Landmark District.

The United States of America

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